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A7D/E Corsair II (for Poser)
$20.00

Description

In 1962, the United States Navy began preliminary work on VAX (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Experimental), a replacement for the A-4 Skyhawk with greater range and payload. Particular emphasis was placed on accurate delivery of weapons to reduce the cost per target. The requirements were finalized in 1963, announcing the VAL (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Light) competition.

To minimize costs, all proposals had to be based on existing designs. Vought, Douglas Aircraft, Grumman and North American Aviation responded. The Vought proposal was based on the successful Vought F-8 Crusader fighter, having a similar configuration, but shorter and more stubby, with a rounded nose. It was selected as the winner on 11 February 1964, and on 19 March the company received a contract for the initial batch of aircraft, designated A-7. In 1965, the aircraft received the popular name Corsair II, after Vought's highly successful Vought F4U Corsair of World War II. (There was also a Vought O2U Corsair biplane scout and observation aircraft in the 1920s.)

Compared to the F-8 fighter, the A-7 had a shorter, broader fuselage. The wing had a longer span, and the unique, variable incidence feature of the F-8 wing was omitted. To achieve the required range, the A-7 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-6 turbofan producing 11,345 lbf (50.5 kN) of thrust, the same innovative combat turbofan produced for the F-111 and early F-14 Tomcats, but without the afterburner needed for supersonic speeds.

The A-7 had a fast and smooth development. The YA-7A made its first flight on 27 September 1965, and began to enter Navy squadron service late in 1966. The first Navy A-7 squadrons reached operational status on 1 February 1967, and began combat operations over Vietnam in December of that year.

The A-7 offered a plethora of cutting-edge avionics compared to contemporary aircraft. This included data link capabilities that, among other features, provided fully "hands-off" carrier landing capability when used in conjunction with its approach power compensator (APC) or auto throttle. Other notable and highly advanced equipment was a projected map display located just below the radar scope. The map display was slaved to the inertial navigation system and provided a high-resolution map image of the aircraft's position superimposed over TPC/JNC charts. Moreover, when slaved to the all-axis auto pilot, the inertial navigation system could fly the aircraft "hands off" to up to nine individual waypoints. Typical inertial drift was minimal for newly manufactured models and the inertial measurement system accepted fly over, radar, and TACAN updates.

The USAF A-7D flew a total of 12,928 combat sorties during the war with only six losses – the lowest of any U.S. fighter in the theater. The aircraft was second only to Boeing B-52 Stratofortress in the amount of ordnance dropped on Hanoi and dropped more bombs per sortie with greater accuracy than any other U.S. attack aircraft.

The Navy A-7E participated in numerous close-air support missions over both North and South Vietnam, the A-7E's state-of-the-art bombing and navigation system being particularly reliable and accurate. The A-7E participated in the mining of Haiphong harbor in 1972, and played a vital role in Operations Linebacker I and Linebacker II that led up to the formal end of US involvement in the Vietnam War on 24 January 1973.

Serving in 'Nam in various roles, the A-7 Corsair also took over the call sign "Sandy" from the A-1 Skyraider to provide escort and protection for rescue missions over Vietnam. The Corsair II participated in various air support missions during the war, and in many other conflicts to follow.

From 1967 to 1971, a total of 27 US Navy squadrons took delivery of four different A-7A/B/C/E models... The Air Force started receiving their version, the A-7D, in 1970. The last US Military Corsair II's were retired by the end of 1998 and stored at Davis-Mothan AFB after 30 years of active service. World wide the A-7 in various forms continued to serve until 2014, when the final user (Greece) at last put theirs to rest!

For more information on the Corsair II please visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LTV_A-7_Corsair_II

Here are some of the Highlights:
* Over 50 Points of Articulation on the main figure!
* Moving Flaps, Ailerons, Spoilers, Rudder. Stabilator, Speed Brakes, Opening Landing Gear Doors, Raising and Lowering Gear, Spin-able Wheels, Steer-able Nose Gear, Opening Canopies, Deployable Slats, Folding Wings, Deployable Tail Hook, Deployable Emergency Drag Chute, Fully Functional Cockpit Flight Controls, and Working Ejection Seat...
* Numerous ERC dials for ease of control from one main location, including dials for various basic flight maneuvers. The weapons sets also have ERC controls for ease of use in images and animation!
* Nose Radome opens to reveal the AN/APQ Radar Set.
* Conforming Dummy Aircrew figure to use to place a Flight Crew in the Cockpit.
* Conforming Crew Boarding Ladders and FOD Storage Covers for the Engine and Air Intake.
* 12 Separate Conforming Weapons sets designed to be Mixed and Matched to create multiple load-outs for the Weapons most commonly carried by the A7 Corsair, with fully controllable ordinance deployment. These Sets are broken down by mounting location so that each set can be properly mix and matched with the others, allowing a total combination of over 100 variations of weapons loads that can be loaded based on mission requirements!

* Note: All of this product's content was created by "theschell" (Christopher D. Schell) with additional help with ERC controls, Poser MAT Files & Additional Texturing by Mark A. Fares (KageRyu). My thanks to Mark for his extra hard work on this figure!

No additional files will be needed to use this product... it is a stand-alone figure!